There was a refreshing shift on the runways this season, and it had little to do with the clothes and everything to do with the casting. While plenty of new faces graced the catwalks as usual, the real surprise was the reappearance of some of the greatest models of the ’90s. Yasmin Le Bon walked at Calvin Klein, Stella Tennant and Georgina Grenville starred at Ferragamo, and Shalom Harlow — who hasn’t set foot on the runway in years — closed Versace (in a floral lace gown and a cloud of her natural ringlets). These women added to the shows a kind of diversity that has been lacking: a range of ages. They also lent strength to the collections, thanks in part to their walks: the powerful, showstopping strides of the original supermodels. — MALINA JOSEPH GILCHRIST, style director, women’s, T magazine
Not long ago, a reader (I’ll call her Kelly) has shared with me about how frustrated she felt and how unlucky she was. Kelly’s an aspiring entrepreneur. She had been trying to find investors to invest in her project. It hadn’t been going well as she was always rejected by the potential investors. And at her most stressful time, her boyfriend broke up with her. And the day after her breakup, she missed an important opportunity to meet an interested investor. She was about to give up because she felt that she’d not be lucky enough to build her business successfully.
Why: Kavita’s been blogging for several years now and it’s been amazing to watch her star rise, from her #OOTD shots as a sixteen year old through to a Coachella VIP frolicking with celebrities. Her bold colourful looks are a great blend of both high street and luxury, though she’s got a soft spot for a Gucci bag – a girl after our own heart, basically.
Do we have Ines de la Fressange to thank for the ubiquity of “French girl style?” The author of “La Parisienne,” she might be responsible for defining exactly what “chic” means for a generation of wannabe French girls. These days, she’s one of the top fashion Instagram influencers who regularly collaborates with the brand Uniqlo to produce limited-edition collections, and managing her own lines.
Though it might vary from location to location, know when the photos are going to come out in the most striking way possible (whatever that might mean for your personal vibe). “Often the best hours for outfit photos are later in the afternoon,” says Chantal van Der Meijden. “I call them the ‘magic hours!’ When the sun is near the horizon and gives a soft hazy front light.”
If a dream is not considered as valid as "real," conscious memory, then I'll still regard it in some corner of the mind as a tiny piece of my history and identity. In Chris Ware's Building Stories, one character is able to partially reconcile her life's regret of neglecting to pursue a creative career because she dreams she had written the book she'd always hoped to. The fact that this book could exist even in her subconscious fantasy was enough for her. Just the notion of her own potential had her wake up in tears.
Fashion’s most unflattering women’s wear trend is far from a spot in our rearview mirrors. Skintight bike shorts pedaled their way onto scores of runways once again this season, having first emerged as a ’90s throwback reference at Off-White this time last year. At Fendi, in a look sported by Bella Hadid, they were long, navy and spandex, with shimmering streaks and a matching leather waist belt. At Roberto Cavalli, Paul Surridge presented a pair for after dark, in ochre with blue sequined embroidery. Over in Paris, the first look from the new creative director at Mugler, Casey Cadwallader, was an oversize, seamed black blazer and — you guessed it — matching biking shorts. And Jacquemus opted for an unforgiving knitted tangerine variation, to be worn with an oversize white shirt and the swagger of someone comfortable with having everything on show. Saddle up! — ELIZABETH PATON, European correspondent, Styles
Women’s fashion week, men’s fashion week — for a few shows, it was everybody’s fashion week, an acknowledgment that the orthodoxies surrounding gender are, at least in certain corners of the world, eroding as we speak. At Maison Margiela, there were bows on boys and suits on girls, and videos of models proclaiming that breaking rules was “My Mutiny.” (It turned out that Mutiny is the name of Margiela’s new fragrance, and that social movements are as co-optable for profit as anything else. Buyer beware.) But there was a genuine sense of play at upstart shows like Luar and Vaquera in New York and the newly rebranded Courrèges in Paris, a refreshing agnosticism about who could (and would) wear what. Who wears the pants? We does! — M.S.
Hi! I'm editor-in-chief of Rookie, a website for teenage girls that I founded in 2011. Every year we put out a book that compiles the best content from that year of the site. Our most recent is Rookie Yearbook Three, published by Razorbill. It is just over 350 pages, and in addition to loads of beautiful artwork and writing are print-exclusives like stickers, valentines, a Rookie pennant, and contributions from the likes of Dakota and Elle Fanning, Shailene Woodley, Lorde, Grimes, Kelis, Sia, Broad City, Bob's Burgers, and more.
“I wish people understood that in fashion less is more.  For example, if you are wearing an off-the-shoulder top, make that your focal point. You don’t need anything else. Huge earrings or a statement necklace will be overwhelming—the top is sexy chic as is!” —Jennifer Berger, stylist and president of Wear it Well   These fashion mistakes are making you look older.
The ‘80s have been back for quite a few seasons now, but there seems to be no stopping this trend. In past seasons, designers have referenced the decade’s big shoulders and glam hues. This season, many designers brought in acid-washed denim. The trend kicked off in New York, with Proenza Schouler sending out a bevy of almost whitewashed denim dresses, trousers, and jackets, and culminated in Paris, where Chanel, Dior, and Stella McCartney jumped on board. 

"Pick out your outfit the night before. I cannot tell you how many times I used to not bother, then be in a rush in the morning and just put on the first thing I could find in a hurry. That way you can pick something practical, stylish and feel great, rather than rushing and feeling like a hot mess all day! Plus it gives you time to pick out your accessories — which I had a habit of running out without when I would pick it out in the morning!" —Submitted byKrissie Gonzalez
The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]
If you don’t pick out your clothing items carefully, you might end up fixing up your outfit every couple of minutes, unable to have any fun at all. Start by choosing shoes which are comfy, and coordinate your outfit with them. Make sure all items fit perfectly, so that nothing is slipping. Also, experts recommend carrying a sturdy chain bag, so your hands can remain free.
It covers many aspects of men's fashion, from Menswear 101 to Outfit of the Day to Dressiquette. For instance, there are fascinating articles entitled “Braces or Belt, Never Both,” “Match Leather to Leather and Metal to Metal,” and “Dressiquette – Your socks should match your pants.” (Although your socks should match your pants, not your shoes, Sergio believes you only need to worry about this in formal situations – he prefers high-contrast brightly colored socks).

Why: Since stumbling across this gorgeous blog, our lives have been so much more colourful. Jess goes beyond the standard #OOTD posts and her site’s a sartorial treasure trove full of styling advice, galleries and even some tips for budding bloggers if you’re thinking of making this list some day. Her masterfully saturated and unique photography is what sets her apart from the rest of the pack and we still can’t stop thinking about her guide to wearing colour this spring…
How to actually do it: "Don't give people too many things to look at all at once," says Halbreich. "If you're wearing a low-cut dress, focus on the cleavage—you don't also need bare arms and legs." The concept applies to fit as well: A body-hugging dress is better with a more sensible neckline and hem, whereas a skirt that hits a few inches above the knee won't raise eyebrows if it's flared rather than tight.
If you don’t pick out your clothing items carefully, you might end up fixing up your outfit every couple of minutes, unable to have any fun at all. Start by choosing shoes which are comfy, and coordinate your outfit with them. Make sure all items fit perfectly, so that nothing is slipping. Also, experts recommend carrying a sturdy chain bag, so your hands can remain free.
A sale should never be a cue to buy something. I mean, not never, but it should not always be (which is the case for most of us). If you have been waiting for a particular product to go on sale, sure, pick it up, but if it’s a random dress you want just because it is on discount, ask yourself if you’d buy it if it wasn’t on sale. You have your answer.
A less strict style, which can also be used for business looks, combining the details of elegant and everyday styles is smart-casual. Giorgio Armani is believed to be the founder of this style, having shown the ways on how to add weightlessness and effortlessness to business looks. Other characteristic features of this style are the garments like comfy jumpers toping strict shirts with the unbuttoned top, etc. You can also cuff the sleeves and use a variety of accessories for complementing the looks including scarfs, earrings, or anything else, not being afraid of opting for bold color and design solutions.
As a business woman, you likely are smart with how you spend your money. There are certainly ways to penny pinch, but your business wardrobe is not one of them. Though the cost may seem like a lot up front, in reality you’ll get a lot of bang for your buck. If the item is high-quality, you’ll be able to wear it many times over many years, making the cost per wear low.
Other recent developments: I was on the cover of magnificent, ad-free The Great Discontent, as well as New York Magazine and Nylon. This is Our Youth playwright Kenneth Lonergan wrote something about me for Vanity Fair, and Annie Leibovitz took the accompanying photo in the same backyard where I used to take pictures every day after school for this blog. Here I am babbling on about all this lunacy:
You hit up your friends for help. For example, when I did a site redesign a few year ago, I asked for help with the overall color and feel. I told them I’d do the work, I just needed their opinion. My friend helped me perfect the site’s color scheme and the feel of the layout. Also told me stuff like “that image needs to be sharper…don’t resize, save in the right format, etc.”
As with any business it is essential to create a marketing strategy. There are many methods in which you can market your fashion blog, so you will need to first determine what methods you will manage yourself—and which ones you will outsource. While your primary goal may be to learn how to write compelling content for your fashion blog, also consider distributing content elsewhere on the web to drive traffic back to your website. When creating your marketing strategy consider online marketing strategies such as:
The Daileigh’s Ashleigh Hutchinson offers articles and courses to help her readers build the perfect closet. She aims to help women aged 20-70 to create a style they love. Ashleigh includes quite a few fashion eBooks on her site, as well as blog posts and beautiful fashion photography. She even holds online webinars to help people improve their fashion sense.
A significant section of the blog is “Outfits,” and this predominantly features what Grasie wears in her daily activities. The posts are highly visual, with captions describing the outfits worn, often explaining why Grasie likes and wears particular items. She generally includes links to sites where her fans can buy items to emulate her look, often giving alternatives in various price ranges. 

This style is practically impossible to imagine without our fave denim pieces. The reason is that denim is practical and comfortable. For instance, you can put on skinny jeans with a short tunic or a light blouse with romantic flare design, of course, not forgetting about the fact that this style doesn’t absolutely bear glamorous details like beads, glitter, or rhinestones.
When in your dashboard, you will see a Bluehost button located in the upper left corner. After clicking on this button, you will be prompted with various tools that can be used for blog customization. These are the only tools you will need to customize your blog, so change what you want and when finished press the launch button to complete your blog.
A sloppily cuffed jean. An ill-fitting blazer. A dress that shows just a little too much to be referred to as "tastefully sheer." These are the things that fashion editors and stylists can spot from a million miles away. To those in the biz, the proper proportions of a crop top may be obvious, but for those seeing the trends in a magazine or online, it can be a little trickier to know exactly how to wear everything.

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“Your makeup can make or break a great outfit so it’s important to know what works for you and what compliments your features and coloring. Contacting a professional can help you figure out how to make your makeup and clothing work together. Also know that even though many women want a ‘natural look’ it actually takes a lot of products and time to do it right.” —Brooke Baker, beauty and style consultant    These makeup mistakes can make you look sloppy.
Less Really Is More: Indecent exposure isn't classy. Celebrity stylist Jen Rade, who has dressed many beauties including Angelina Jolie, told In Style that only one body part should be exposed at a time. If you're baring your decolletage, don't also show off your legs. Remember ladies, a little bit of mystery is alluring. Some things are better left to the imagination. Source: In Style 

Everything is now a matter of life and death. Math homework: NOT A PRIORITY WHEN THE END COULD BE RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER. Cleaning my room: IS THIS REALLY HOW I WANT TO SPEND MY LAST HOURS ON EARTH WHEN I COULD GET HIT BY A CAR TOMORROW? Etc. The habit that blog-keeping instilled in me of compulsively archiving every single thing only worsens. If I get behind in my journal, I spend hours wondering where to even start. I can't pay attention in class, only make scattered notes where there should be a timeline of the Industrial Revolution, listing all the details I need to get down properly as soon as I have time: The music we listened to in Claire's room, the old man I saw on my way to school, the view from my boyfriend's car when we sat in a 7-Eleven parking lot watching people walk in and trying to predict their purchases, along with a record of what each person looked like and what they bought. My hands tremble, relaxing only once everything has been sufficiently documented, each memory in my grasp, as if by putting them down on paper, I can make them last forever.

"The Fashion Guitar" is the online style diary of Dutch-born, New York City-based blogger Charlotte Groeneveld-Van Haren. Charlotte's quirky, feminine style often involves pairing romantic fashions with classic wardrobe essentials. More often than not, her daily outfits involve statement dresses, cool skirts and patterns and prints aplenty. Her blog is a go-to destination for fashion lovers seeking inspiration for a fun take on the prettiest trends.


Many of her posts are highly visual – showcasing the same types of images usually shared on Instagram. This is particularly relevant in her OOTD (Outfit of the Day) category. She shares luscious photos of her day, detailing everything she wears. Kyrzayda provides links to where you can buy what you like. Her followers apparently like to share her OOTD. There are always plenty of comments from her fans giving her opinion on the outfits.
He wasn’t the only designer to incorporate artwork into the runway experience. At Loewe, Jonathan Anderson installed several rooms of artwork at Maison de l’Unesco for his show: There were woven baskets in some (by Joe Hogan, a finalist for this year's Loewe Craft Prize and one of its past winners), ceramics in others (by Ryoji Koie) and, in the room where I was seated, giant whirring brushes of the kind that you might otherwise find at a car wash (by Lara Favoretto) — after the show, security guards gleefully posed alongside them. And at Vivienne Westwood, Andreas Kronthaler went full circus. He worked with Bernhard Willhelm, who art directed the show; there were musclemen riding scooters and models riding skateboards and, as a centerpiece, an enormous paper sculpture by the London-based set designer Gary Card, who spent the show in the middle of it all, fixing and remolding it with a team of assistants wielding bottles of flame retardant. The cumulative effect — and how often can you say this at a fashion show — was a good time had by all. — MATTHEW SCHNEIER, deputy fashion critic and reporter, Styles
The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]
9. Wear lipstick. Even if your smile is more like the pursed-lip grin of Mona Lisa until you get serious about whitening your teeth or finishing your dental work, a little color energizes your face and brings attention to what you say. And if you're dashing around doing errands or working from home, lipstick may be all you need to perk up the day. Be it a rich nude caramel, sheer sandy pink, rosy tan or go-for-it red, find your best shade and forget about trends.
“If you have a boxy (or apple) body type, the goal is to create curves and elongate your silhouette. Stay away from boxy loose fitting shapes and monotone colors on both top and bottom. Instead select wardrobe pieces that have a strong emphasis on the waist and when in doubt wear a belt to give the illusion of a natural waist. An ordinary boxy sweater when paired with a thick belt can add instant curves to your body.” —Ms. Michniak
I was asked to share my "big big world" at the Sydney Opera House and the Melbourne Writers Festival and mostly talked about fangirling, the anxiety of influence, and being happy instead of putting pressure on yourself to be some tortured artist. I love Neil Gaiman's "make good art" speech, but I wanted to talk about what happens when you can't make good art, and about how fulfilling it can be to appreciate other people's art. If you prefer to watch the FIRST-EVER DELIVERY of this thing, the Sydney one is here, but I've embedded the slightly-updated Melbourne one above.

From the beginning, start promoting your blog to family, friends, and your social network (without being overly annoying, of course). This is your best bet for testing out your brand and content. The truth is, no one will read your first couple posts outside of the people you tell about your blog, so there's no reason to freak out every time you hit the publish button. Just get some content out there and start getting honest feedback from people.
About Blog Hi, I am Kier Mellour. On this blog, you will find weekly “I want that” posts where I share my current cravings, style inspiration posts, and personal outfits for a variety of events and travel destinations. There will be videos of thrift store hauls, current favorite products, as well as, thorough reviews on clothing, accessories, and lifestyle products.
“Fashion” is a broad term used to describe many genres of clothing and accessories. Before you get started it is essential to select your area of expertise. This needs to be more detailed than writing a blog that appeals to men, women, teens, or children—but instead, you must focus on a specific niche within the industry. The area of expertise you select will be used to help create your marketing strategy, website URL, and website design. For example, you could select:
If you don’t pick out your clothing items carefully, you might end up fixing up your outfit every couple of minutes, unable to have any fun at all. Start by choosing shoes which are comfy, and coordinate your outfit with them. Make sure all items fit perfectly, so that nothing is slipping. Also, experts recommend carrying a sturdy chain bag, so your hands can remain free.

The ‘80s have been back for quite a few seasons now, but there seems to be no stopping this trend. In past seasons, designers have referenced the decade’s big shoulders and glam hues. This season, many designers brought in acid-washed denim. The trend kicked off in New York, with Proenza Schouler sending out a bevy of almost whitewashed denim dresses, trousers, and jackets, and culminated in Paris, where Chanel, Dior, and Stella McCartney jumped on board.
"My style is really minimalist. The simpler, the better. I always try to have a balance between what I'm wearing in my upper and lower body. If I'm wearing some simple jeans or a simple skirt, I try to add some scarves or lots of necklaces. If I wear lots of neck accessories I avoid using big hats and lots of bracelets. And it's the other way round: If I'm wearing some saggy jeans with a huge belt I try to keep it simple in the upper body. " —Submitted by Valeria Bernal Malek
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